Archive for the ‘Evangelical Doctrine’ Category

The Shack movie: improvements?

January 4, 2018

Maybe some people have recently had the DVD of the ‘The Shack’ for Christmas? I saw the film last year, wrote up these thoughts and shelved them because they are long. Maybe they will help someone?

Seeing The Shack on screen is more vivid than reading the book.  All that is great about the portrayal of the Trinity is clearer. Not so good elements are clearer too. Some of the resolution comes too easily. Jesus and the ‘hero’ Mac, whose daughter Missy has been abducted, abused and murdered, run across a lake. They skim the surface unbelievably. More plunging the depths is needed: the depths of Mac’s anger, the depths of the pain taken on by Jesus, the depths of the many-formed self-giving of the Holy Spirit.

What different scenes could there have been..? Here are some…

1

Jesus entices Mac into his workshop with the lure of a tool that Mack has always wanted to use. Inside Mac finds the beginnings of a child-size coffin. Mac’s fury is unleashed. Accusing Jesus of planning his daughter’s death as some sick sacrifice, of standing by while little children suffer unimaginably, of punishing people by taking away their most precious treasure, Mac smashes and rips and pounds all that he can. Tools and nails and splintered wood fly around the workshop, glass shatters into blood-letting shards.

Jesus comes close to Mac, so that some of Mac’s blows fall on him. Jesus stands between Mac and a shattering window so that the shards shed Jesus’ blood. Angels appear and disappear, wings protecting Mac from his own violence, giving Jesus no protection. Jesus winces and cries out in pain as he is wounded.

Mac’s huge wave of anger subsides; his energy drained. He looks at the devastation around him. He reaches for a sharply splintered section of wood and tries to cut himself. Sometimes he succeeds. Sometimes Jesus manages to place his hand under Mac’s cutting hand. Again Jesus bleeds, clearly in pain. The wounds in Jesus mirror the wounds in Mac.

‘What are you doing?’ sneers Mac.

‘What are you doing?’ says Jesus calmly.

‘You think pretending to be the victim, not the judge, will win me over?’ spits back Mac. ‘You’re the punisher, you’re the one who sees all and holds it all against us. You wanted Missy dead to punish me for my killing. If you think that’s the way to get me to beg for forgiveness, think again!’

Jesus looks calmly at Mac. ‘I don’t make that connection. Trust me. The enemy is the stealer, the killer, the destroyer. I am with you for your good. Do you want me to stay?’

Mac is quiet. Eventually he nods. ‘I don’t understand but there’s something good about having you around.’

‘Thanks.’ Replies Jesus warmly, sounding relieved. ‘And you can be forgiven, when you’re ready. Healing can come, when you want it. I’m not sure you want it yet.’

‘Just when I thought I was comfortable with you…’ says Mac a little exasperated. He shakes his head. ‘Give me some time.’

‘There’s a bed for you in Papa’s house. Come on, I’ll take you.’

2

The following morning Mac meets Papa at breakfast.

‘It’s tough when you child dies,’ says Papa warmly.

Mac looks back with some anger still but now tired.

‘How many children do you have?’ asks Papa.

‘Three, or … What kind of a question is that?’

‘And how many of your children have been hurt bad?’

‘You’re supposed to know everything.’

‘How many children do I have?.. Do you think I’m so different to you? And how many of my children have been hurt bad?.. You’ve been furious. Yeah, we know all about that! When we want to take the attackers’ children and have them torn limb from limb in front of their eyes. When we want them to burn with pain outside and inside so they feel what they have done.’

Mac looks up, surprised.

‘They’re not just your thoughts, Mac. We know! How many children’s tears rip into our heart?’

Mac holds his head in his hands.

‘Mac,’ says Papa gently, reaching out to touch his hands. ‘We want to make it better. Just like you. Make it better for your kids, for all the kids, even the grown-up ones. How does hurting someone who has hurt someone make it better?’

Mac relaxes, collapses ‘OK, OK! You win.’

‘And how can you heal someone who doesn’t want to be healed; they just want someone else to hurt?’

‘I guess you let them do some hurting and wait for them to want it to be made better…’

3

Mac goes back to his room. He hears a groaning, a yearning, an anguishing cry beyond words. He searches for where this sound comes from. The Holy Spirit is bent double, clutching her belly. Her hands and arms are cut, bleeding, like Jesus’ hands and arms.

Mac grimaces at the sound, shaking his head, trying to distance himself. But as he walks away, there is an even more piercing shriek. Mac turns round quickly his mouth gaping open. He echoes the cry.

After that cry, Mac tries to pull himself together, but tears are beginning to fall. His tears mirror the tears of the Holy Spirit, her tears mirror his. Gradually he lets go and echoes the groaning of the Spirit.

The Holy Spirit echoes Mac and also begins to look more like him. Together they weep and cry and groan and shout.

The wave of anguish ebbs away.

‘You do know. You do feel.’ Mac shakes his head in wonder. ‘I always thought you were impervious to feeling.’

The Holy Spirit shakes her head, still looking like Mac. ‘Love always feels. We never stop feeling.’

‘Thank you,’ says Mac wiping his eyes and sinking back exhausted. ‘That does feel a little better.’

‘We want to make it better.’

Mac smiles ‘I’ve heard that somewhere before.’

‘For all our children? The Holy Spirit now looks more like the Father. ‘Will you let us make it better?’

Mac nods, a tired but definite deep nod. ‘Yes. I want it made better too.’

‘You don’t want someone else to hurt?’

Mac shakes his head, tired and definite again. ‘Not now.’

‘Come here!’ invites the Holy Spirit with great motherly warmth. As Mac comes to her, her arms become huge wings with golden feathers and he rests and sleeps like a little child. The Holy Spirit becomes a great dove hovering, brooding, over Mac. Angels come with bright glittery clouds which they gently pour into Mac’s head. His forehead seems to glitter a little from inside as his eyelids move rapidly. The Holy Spirit bends down and kisses Mac’s head. ‘Sweet dreams Mac!’

4

Mac awakes and goes out for a walk. He sees Jesus a little way off and goes to join him.

‘Man! How do you do it?’ Mac asks in wonder. ‘I’m not the same and, you know, I am sorry now. Sorry for smashing up your shed. So sorry for… killing… my Dad. It didn’t make anything better, did it? Only worse.’

Jesus smiles at Mac. ‘Thank you. That’s a great gift. Is there anything else you want to give me?’

Mac looks a little nervous.

‘Just that while you’re in apologising mood, you might like to add something?’

‘Yeah. Why not?’ The camera moves away so that Mac and Jesus are further away and their voices soon cannot be heard. ‘I’m sorry I’ve ignored my daughter. I wasn’t making it better for her either…’

The sunlight moves, indicating that a couple of hours have passed. Jesus stands in front of Mac as the camera moves in again. Jesus holds out his hands showing his nail-wounds. He smiles. ‘Peace be with you, Mac. You are forgiven.’ He looks Mac in the face and nods. Then he takes a deep breath, fills his lungs, throws back his head. ‘YOU ARE FORGIVEN!’ Jesus proclaims, his voice reverberating around the tress and buildings. Mac stands buffeted and buttressed by the sound as in a strong wind. Jesus then leans in close to Mac and adds, more quietly. ‘And you always will be!’

‘Come and see!’ says Jesus excitedly, taking Mac’s arm. They go to Jesus’ shed. Angels, hundreds of angels, are just leaving, Huge bright beings, some with wings, some like people, some shafts of light, broad or fine, many with workman’s tools.

‘They’re good at their work for us’ says Jesus. The shed has been transformed. The broken glass has become fresh diamond insets, the broken wood has become part of an intricate pattern of jagged and rounded shapes. The whole place is larger than before and more intricate and also more useful, with more space for work of different kinds.

‘I did that, and you did that!’ Mac exclaims in awe.

‘We want to make it better. We can make it better. When you let us.’

Now Mac sees and meets his father. Now Mac sees Missy in her field, with Jesus and with her grandfather.

5

Another morning, another breakfast is finishing. Plates show remains of barbequed fish. A charcoal barbeque is close by, one last fish still on it.

Papa leans back contentedly. ‘Mac, we’d love you to stay, but we’d love you to love a little more.’

Mac looks puzzled.

‘Why don’t you three go for a walk?’ invites Papa cheerily and firmly.

Jesus and the Holy Spirit stand up and invite Mac to join them. ‘OK!’ Mac says, a little puzzled but happy.

As they walk along the Holy Spirit becomes a dove, or like a dove, again, hovering over them. They reach the lake where there is a small sail boat. Jesus steps in and invites Mac to join him. The Holy Spirit fades and becomes faint. We can just make out her wings, now very large and fanning. A wind from the Holy Spirit blows the boat along.

‘Faster?’ asks Jesus.

‘You bet!’ replies Mac.

The wind rips into the sail and the boat takes off at a perilous angle. Jesus and Mac yell and yelp as they career along, pulling ropes, leaning out, laughing in the spray.

‘Where are we going?’ shouts Mac.

‘Haha!’ shouts Jesus back. ‘It’s up to her!’

The boat veers and turns and speeds forward and calms to pottering before speeding up again.

‘Enough already!’ yells Mac at last. The wind calms down.

‘Man, am I hot!’ exclaims Mac.

‘Shower?’ asks Jesus.

‘I could do with a full body cool wash!’ laughs Mac.

The Holy Spirit is back over them, now like a cloud. A gentle shower begins to fall on Mac and on Jesus. Mac tilts his head back to receive the water on his face. ‘Man, that is so sweet!’

‘More?’ asks Jesus. Mac nods.

The water starts coming a little more strongly. ‘More?’ asks Jesus. Mac nods. A few times until Mac is standing under a great torrent, his body moving sensuously taking pleasure in the flowing waterfall.

‘Enough already!’ yells Mac. Jesus slaps him on the back with approval.

‘How do you get dry in this place?’ asks Mac.

‘Like everything,’ replies Jesus happily. ‘You ask. Anything. Try it!’

‘Hey! You!’ Mac turns to the cloud-Holy-Spirit above him. ‘Can I have a towel please?’

The cloud flattens out, becomes white and fluffy and comes down, wrapping itself around Mac.

‘How many wows can you give a guy?’ asks Mac in wonder, clutching his perfect towel, now bathrobe.

‘More than you can ask or imagine!’ shouts Jesus and gives Mac a high five.

Jesus sits down on the grass. Mac sits beside him. ‘If you go,’ says Jesus, ‘you can go with me with you, and with her.’ The bathrobe lifts off Mac and becomes the female Holy Spirit again.

Mac looks puzzled. ‘You’ll have to look. It’s a bit murky there, you know. You’ll see me but blurry, like a reflection in the body of a beat up old car. I won’t be as bright as many other things. You’ll have to keep looking. But I’ll be there. With you. Always.’

‘And her?’ Mac gestures towards the Holy Spirit.

‘Who does she look like?’ asks Jesus.

Mac turns and looks intently, puzzling it out. We see his face, looking. ‘She looks like you!’ Mac exclaims. The Holy Spirit has indeed changed to look like a more female version of Jesus.

‘That’s who she is really,’ affirms Jesus. ‘And now?’

Mac looks again, moving his head to the left, to the right, quizzical. As though he can’t quite make out what he’s seeing.

‘Does she look like me?’ asks Mac tentatively. The Holy Spirit has indeed changed to look like a kinder, wiser, younger Mac.

‘Why does she want to look like me?’ asks Mac with some self-disdain.

‘So she can fit into you,’ says Jesus calmly, seriously, nodding affirmation. ‘She will be with you, she will be in you. OK?’

Mac looks bemused. ‘How?’

‘Take her in!’ commands Jesus, then more loudly: ‘Take her in!’

Jesus blows hard on Mac. At the same time the Holy Spirit becomes a cloud, moving swiftly, darting round Mac, brushing past him, returning under him, swirling. His hair moves as blown by a strong wind.

‘Don’t let her just pass by. Take her IN!’ shouts Jesus. He sucks in a great gulp of air. Mac does the same. His cheeks puff out. He looks tense. Then he swallows. A couple more sucks and swallows.

Mac starts giggling. ‘Ye-hu, ye-hu, ye-hi-hu!’ He laughs. ‘It’s like tickling, but it’s warm! It’s so weird! And so good! Ye-hu, ye-hu, ye-hi-hu! Ye-ha, ye-ha, ye-hi ha. Yee hah!’ Mac falls over laughing. ‘I’m burning, man! I’m burning! Man!’

‘Yeah,’ nods Jesus with a broad grin. ’She fits, you know. And she brings gifts. The fire’s good. Real good. Wait till you have the living water, or the dove, or  the oil. Man! That oil is so GOOD! More than you can ask or imagine eh?’

Mac, still laughing nods. ‘Too true! Man! So GOOD!’

‘Enjoy the pictures, enjoy the nudges, enjoy the surprising thoughts. She’ll lead you into everything you need to know. She’ll guide you every step of the way. She will not leave you nor forsake you.’

Mac calms down to chuckling. ‘You mean I get to keep this?’

‘You get to keep the Holy Spirit. You just keep asking, keep taking her in. And you get to keep me. You just keep looking. Now…’ Jesus pauses to gain Mac’s full attention. ‘Are you ready to go back and do some loving?’

‘I need to do something with all this!’ Mac shouts, waving his hands in front of his belly and up to his chest and out around him. ‘This isn’t just for me is it? This is for sharing, for making things better.’

‘You got it!’ exclaims Jesus. ‘Are you ready to go back and do some loving? Are you ready to love patiently, when they think you’re just a weirdo and keep their distance or drive you out of your job and your town? Are you ready to love in tears when the pain is almost unbearable? Are you ready to love all the selfish and nasty people? Are you ready Mac?’

Mac holds up one hand, to ask a question. Jesus nods.

‘What about Papa? Do I go without Papa?’

‘Papa is in me with you. Papa is in the Holy Spirit in you. Papa is closer than the sky. Papa is not far, not far at all!’

‘Thank you.’ Mac beams at Jesus. He holds out his hands in front of him in surrender to Jesus. ‘I’ll go.’

‘As Papa sent me, so I send you!’ Jesus speaks calmly and with great authority.

Mac wakes up in his crashed car, wincing in deep pain, but also chuckling a little.

Roger Harper

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A woman Bishop of London? God’s not bothered. 22 December

December 22, 2017

I remember the Big Deal that the ordination of women was in the 1980s. Battle-lines, campaigning groups, bad disagreement. Predictions of disaster brought about by ‘fundamental change’ to Bible teaching and Church tradition.

An Evangelical Archbishop of Canterbury, George Carey, took a bold stance by disagreeing strongly with the Conservative Evangelicals. Carey called the Church to make the general principle of ‘in Christ there is no male nor female’ more important than particular instructions to particular churches on women in church. Jesus had gone as far as he could in welcoming women as forefront disciples, not least in giving women the responsibility of witnessing to his resurrection. The focus had to be first and foremost on Jesus rather than equally on Moses, Paul and Jesus: ‘Listen to him!’

George Carey, and others, also made sure that no-one would be coerced contrary to conscience. The Church would have two, apparently conflicting, practices to match the conflicting theologies. Some churches would have women in leadership, some would not. Room was made for both. The same decision was made for marriage after divorce, some clergy and parishes taking the weddings of divorcees, some not. Without this, Prince Harry’s marriage to a divorcee would have been tricky, at least.

The Church of England took the step that has now led to Sarah Mullally the next Bishop of London, a Bishop in a direct line of succession from the first Apostles. Paul wrote that an Apostle had to be a witness of the resurrection. It took the Church a long time to recognise the implications of the gender of the very first witnesses of the resurrection. The Holy Spirit leads into truths which, sometimes for a very long time, Christians cannot bear.

Predictions of disaster were not fulfilled. (The gut human belief: change = disaster is another sign of the fall and the fear that we all inherit.) The Church of England has not fared notably worse with women leading parishes and dioceses. Yes, there has been continuing decline, as would be expected in the most Christendom Church as we leave Christendom, but not because of women in leadership. Churches led by women vicars grow, generally, much the same as those led by men vicars. (I don’t think anyone has dared to do these statistics; this is my view, mostly from across the West and East Midlands.)

What about churches who refuse to have women in leadership? My experience is that these churches too grow with the same variety as Anglican churches generally. I think of one Midlands church officially unaccepting of women priests and bishops, running thriving Alpha courses with remarkable Holy Spirit Days and healthy congregations. Predictions of disaster here too have not been fulfilled.

The Gamaliel Principle is that we should allow people to go ahead as they deem best and see if God blesses their ministry (Acts 5:33-39.) The experience of the last 30 years is that God, the Holy Spirit, seems happy to bless ministry whether by those pro or anti women in church leadership. He’s not bothered. Women in leadership is not a Primary Issue for Him. If it were, the results would be obvious by now. He loves all who faithfully follow Jesus within their own limited understandings.

Can we learn from this for our current debate about Gay Marriage? Might this be something into which the Holy Spirit is leading the Church, though it could not have been borne before? Might the principle of loving faithfulness, to one person, for life, coming out of the heart, be more important than particular mention of particular physical practices? What happens when we do not listen to Moses, Paul and Jesus equally, but listen to Jesus first and foremost?

(Welcoming Gay Marriage is not welcoming all relationships of all LGBT people. The life-long commitment to one person specifically excludes anyone wanting to be a practising bisexual.)

How would the Gamaliel Principle be applied today? Could the Church of England allow, even encourage, two different, apparently conflicting practices, to match the conflicting theologies? Then we could see how the Holy Spirit blesses the different ministries.

Some people say that Gay Marriage is so definitely a Primary Biblical or Church Tradition issue that there can be no fellowship with those who adopt a new understanding and practice. How do they know? How do we know? 30 years ago people were saying the same about women in leadership. Maybe God will be proved to be not so bothered about gay marriage either.

Roger Harper

Changing the picture of hell: 23 August

August 23, 2017

Giovanni Rimini Harrowing Only

Here is Jesus pulling people out of hell. This was the dominant picture of hell for many years. ‘Look! Jesus rescues people from hell.’ A hopeful picture.

This picture is one of six which together make up the Scenes from the Life of Christ, by Giovanni di Rimini, usually seen in Rimini, but currently, until 8 October, in a special small exhibition at the National Gallery in London. The catalogue describes the painting as showing the standard highlights of the life of Jesus. At the time, 1300 – 1305, it was normal to show Jesus pulling people out of hell.

Jesus pulling people out of hell is usually called The Harrowing of Hell. Harrowing here has an old, Middle English, meaning of Despoiling. Jesus is making hell impotent, depleted, empty. This is an accepted and important part of what Jesus came to do.

Very soon, though, this picture changed dramatically. Dante’s Inferno, the most influential book on hell ever, was written about 1314. Over the door of Dante’s hell is written ‘Abandon hope all you who enter here.’ The idea that Jesus can and does pull people out of hell was quashed. Fear replaced hope.

Dante was writing graphically about the hell described by the theologian Thomas Aquinas. The Church made this ‘no hope, more fear’ version of hell the dominant one. The Harrowing of Hell was no longer painted. Instead we see

Salisbury-St-Thomass-credit-to-www.visitwiltshire.co_.uk_Photo from www.visitwiltshire.co.uk

Here Jesus presides over people being thrown into a vividly tormenting hell. Jesus is far removed from these people, and seems not to care about them. Their awful fate is sealed as decided, or supervised, by Jesus.

These pictures, of the Doom, or Last Judgement, became common, replacing the Harrowing of Hell. Above is the best preserved English painting, in St Thomas’ Church, Salisbury, painted about 1475.

Florence Duomo Fresco 2Photo by Paolo Villa – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39353393

Here is perhaps the most well-known Last Judgement painting, from the Duomo Cathedral in Florence. The artist Vasari began this in 1568 and it was completed by Federico Zuccari in 1579.

As in the English painting, the people in inescapable torment in hell are closest to the congregation. Seeing these agonised people, remote from Jesus, gives a very different message from seeing Jesus pulling people out of hell. ‘Look Jesus presides over people being tormented in hell forever.’

Hell changed in the early 1300s. The painting now in the National Gallery is perhaps the last still to show Jesus pulling people out of hell.

Why did the picture of hell change then? What is the true picture of hell? My book The Lie of Hell www.laddermedia.co.uk gives answers. Or search ‘hell’ for other posts on this blog.

The picture of hell has changed. It needs to change again – to the Hades and Gehenna about which Jesus spoke. Hades the tormenting remand prison before Final Judgement; Gehenna the unquenchable fire after Final Judgement where some unrepentant humans are destroyed, body and soul. This dual picture includes Jesus having, and, by implication, using, the keys of Hades, pulling people out of Hades. A stern warning and a serious, sure, splendid, hope.

Roger Harper

 

Atonement as Blood Covering, A Fresh Understanding? 17 November

November 17, 2016

On Sunday evening I was talking ‘Atonement’ with assorted Derby clergy who do beer and theology once a month. I was presenting an understanding that the central problem with sin is the wounds we inflict on others. God deals with this by a covering of blood like a scab covering a wound to enable healing and prevent festering.

‘There goes my theology!’ said one Minister half-joking. He described himself as less Conservative Evangelical than he has been. He recognised that the ‘Blood Covering’ understanding has claims to be more Biblical than the classic Evangelical view.

‘Why haven’t I heard this before?’ asked a fired-up Minister’s spouse. He was aghast that he was hearing a Bible truth which he thought many others needed to have heard before. 

This understanding comes from Leviticus 16, the instructions for the Annual Dealing With Sin – Yom Kippur. ‘Kippur’ means, simply and literally, ‘covering.’ The blood makes a Covering, v 27. (‘Kippur’ was spread over the inside and outside of Noah’s Ark to prevent it leaking. There kippur is usually translated ‘pitch.’ A covering which protects, preserves, makes good.) When Wycliffe was translating into English he didn’t want to translate kippur as ‘covering’ (not sure entirely why not) so he invented a new word: ‘at-one-ment.’ For years we have thought that the blood ‘makes atonement’ whereas the Hebrew is more literally that the blood is ‘for covering.’ This has been known in theological circles for a long time. 

Where do we see blood covering? Blood is released by a wound and then covers the wound to form a scab. This covering by blood enables healing, repair, reconstruction, to take place under the covering. The covering by blood stops infection from entering the wound and hindering healing. (Similar to the pitch-covering stopping the waters of chaos from seeping into and damaging the ark.) Is this the fundamental understanding of what is happening to the sins of the people? Their wounds, especially the wounds they have inflicted on others, are covered by God-given blood so that healing and repair can happen, without the world, the flesh and the devil hindering the process of healing? This likening of the Covering by blood to the formation of a scab is probably a new insight.

A further insight from the Hebrew, which I have not fully thought through, is that the covering happens in the Holy of Holies, the blood being placed specifically on the top to the covenant box. We are used to this top as the ‘mercy seat.’ The Hebrew word is ‘kaporet.’ The same ‘kpr’ root as ‘kippur.’ The NRSV translation rightly notes that the Hebrew is literally the ‘cover.’ The blood–covering is placed on the cover. Does the blood renew the cover, annually? Is this like a damaged scab being renewed with more blood, covering the parts which have become exposed? 

Implications of ‘Blood Covering’ as how God deals with sin:

The primary focus is on what the blood covers rather than on the relationship between humankind and God. The primary problem with sin is that humans wound each other. This damage provokes God to anger, as any parent is angry against someone hurting their child. The anger means that there has to be a distance between God and the wounder. But the rift with God is not dealt with directly, even by an intermediary, leaving the wounds untouched. The rift with God is dealt with by the blood which covers and heals the wounds. Once the wounds are on the way to being healed, God’s anger can pass and the relationship with Him is restored. 

On the cross Jesus was pouring out His blood to cover all the wounds inflicted by humanity, thereby bringing healing, repair, to those wounds. By Hs stripes we are healed. The blood which oozes from cuts all over Jesus’ body, covers not the wounds to His skin and tissue, but the wounds we have inflicted on other people. On the Cross Jesus was extending His ministry of healing. He had demonstrated Himself as the Healer par excellence. As he died, His blood, His life, was made available for wound/injury-healing for everyone, everywhere. There is a clear connection between Jesus ministry and death, which are often separated in other understandings of the cross.

The world, the flesh and the devil try to make wounds fester. Festering wounds, in people’s bodies, hearts, communities, nations, are the work of evil, trying to hinder the work of God through Jesus. How much do we see this in our world, our news?

The blood stops the forces of festering. The wounds are then healed gradually. Jesus’s blood covers once and for all. ‘Under the blood’ the Holy Spirit works gradually to heal, repair, sanctify. The work of the Holy Spirit in cooperation with Jesus is seen to be integral. Other understandings of the cross don’t see the Holy Spirit as integral to the process.

The primary focus on the wounds we have inflicted (rather than on the rift in our relationship with God which is a consequence of the wounds) is the same as the Biblical focus in Judgement on ‘according to their deeds.’ (Mth 25:31-46 Sheep and goats, Rev 20:12,13 and many other places.) We are not judged for what we believe or how we have related to God. We are judged according to what we have done. (This goes against the understanding that idolatry is the central problem in humanity.) All of us have injured some people. That is our central problem to which we have to face up. (Our good deeds are irrelevant. The common view that the good deeds outweigh the bad is like making a defence in court on a stabbing charge by saying ‘I’ve donated millions to charity.’ What else we have done is not the point.) Have we inflicted injury? Was it our responsibility? How are we going to put it right? Those are the central questions. We need Jesus to put it right, heal the wounds we have inflicted, by faith in His blood shed on the cross. (Idolatry can and does lead to us wounding others and thinking it is justified for the sake of all kinds of false gods. Idolatry is a malign influence, but the wounds which idolatry justifies are the core problem. Think someone walking by on the other side because their understanding of religious purity, or of bad events being God’s will / punishment, trumps the need to help the injured traveller.)

This understanding answers the exact question ‘What does it mean that Christ died for our sins?’ ‘Christ died to cover our sins, the wounds we have inflicted on others, like a scab covers a wound, ensuring that, in the end, the wound is healed. Christ’s death, Christ’s blood, means that all sins are covered, ultimately healed.’ The classic Evangelical understanding says ‘Christ died for me. He died in my place. He took the anger of God so that it doesn’t come to me.’ This is answering a slightly different question: ‘What does it mean that Christ died for me?’ The Evangelical answer says my sins caused God’s wrath but leaves me in a good place and my sins untouched.

The primary focus on the wounds we have inflicted also echoes the ‘Life Review’ in Near-Death Experiences. This Review enables us to see and to feel all the wounds we have inflicted, so that we can acknowledge responsibility for them and have them healed by the Being of Light.

Is the Blood Covering understanding a fresh insight? Has the connection between covering by sacrificial blood and covering by a scab been made before?

Can the Blood Covering understanding be said to be more Biblical than the classic Evangelical understanding?

Please comment!

Roger Harper